Wednesday, May 14, 2008

The Strange, New World of Liturgy

Over at Christianity Today, Mark Galli offers some interesting thoughts on why liturgy is becoming more attractive to many evangelicals when, on the surface, it appears to not pass the test of "relevance." Compared to what a lot of megachurches are doing, liturgical worship appears to be anything but relevant:

The worship leaders wear medieval robes and guide the congregation through a ritual that is anything but spontaneous; they lead music that is hundreds of years old; they say prayers that are scripted and formal; the homily is based on a 2,000-year-old book; and the high point of the service is taken up with eating the flesh and drinking the blood of a Rabbi executed in Israel when it was under Roman occupation.

And yet ...

A closer look suggests that something more profound and paradoxical is going on in liturgy than the search for contemporary relevance. "The liturgy begins … as a real separation from the world," writes Orthodox theologian Alexander Schmemann. He continues by saying that in the attempt to "make Christianity understandable to this mythical 'modern' man on the street," we have forgotten this necessary separation.

It is precisely the point of the liturgy to take people out of their worlds and usher them into a strange, new world—to show them that, despite appearances, the last thing in the world they need is more of the world out of which they've come. The world the liturgy reveals does not seem relevant at first glance, but it turns out that the world it reveals is more real than the one we inhabit day by day.

Read it all.

Hat tip: The Eternal Pursuit.

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