Tuesday, August 25, 2009

From Borg to Buddha

On November 30, 1999, I ordered a copy of Marcus J. Borg's book Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time: The Historical Jesus and the Heart of Contemporary Faith from Amazon.com.

This morning, I received the following e-mail from Amazon.com:

As someone who has purchased or rated books by Marcus J. Borg, you might like to know that Buddhist Meditation for Beginners: Four Classic Teachings from the Author Who Introduced a Generation of Americans to Insight Meditation will be released on September 1, 2009.

Apparently, a lot of Borg readers also buy Buddhist resources from Amazon.com.

I doubt I'll receive a similar notification for having purchased N. T. Wright's The Resurrection of the Son of God, or Bishop Kallistos Ware's The Orthodox Way, or William C. Mattison's Introducting Moral Theology: True Happiness and the Virtues.

6 comments:

BillyD said...

Don't get me started on what appropriate recommendations following a purchase of +Durham's works might be.

And there's nothing wrong in using Buddhist meditation techniques, either.

Humph.

Bryan Owen said...

You're quite right, BillyD, there is nothing wrong with Christians using Buddhist meditation techniques. I'm just struck by my experiences of "progressives" who consistently go beyond the confines of the Christian tradition for their spiritual sustenance. They worship as Episcopalians on Sundays, but the rest of the week they practice Buddhist meditation, or Jungian dream work, or they read Sufi writings instead of the Bible, etc.

It's okay to mad at Bishop Wright. But please bear in mind: nothing he has said or done vis-à-vis the Episcopal Church or particular persons within it - no matter how insensitive or politically motivated - has anything whatsoever to do with the value of his scholarship on the historicity of the resurrection.

Perpetua said...

Marcus Borg co-wrote a book with Jack Kornfield, Jesus and Buddha: The Parallel Sayings.

Bryan Owen said...

That makes sense. As I recall, Borg primarily sees Jesus as a sage, an incarnation of God's wisdom. By that, I don't think he means the same thing as what the Nicene Creed means by "God from God."

BillyD said...

...nothing he has said or done vis-à-vis the Episcopal Church or particular persons within it - no matter how insensitive or politically motivated - has anything whatsoever to do with the value of his scholarship on the historicity of the resurrection.

Oh, I know that. And I've got at least one of his books around here someplace. I'm just irritated with him.

Bryan Owen said...

That's okay, BillyD. I love what I've read of Wright's scholarship, but he's far from perfect as a human being.