Monday, March 21, 2011

Abandoning the Language of Sin

"Abandoning the language of sin will not make sin go away. Human beings will continue to experience alienation, deformation, damnation, and death no matter what we call them. Abandoning the language will simply leave us speechless before them, and increase our denial of their presence in our lives. Ironically, it will also weaken the language of grace, since the full impact of forgiveness cannot be felt apart from the full impact of what has been forgiven."

5 comments:

George said...

More good stuff Bryan, as one who struggles the gems you are sharing are truly a blessing and cause for reflection.

thanks

Bryan Owen said...

Thanks, George. We're reading Taylor's book for this year's Lenten Book Study at the Cathedral where I serve. There are parts of the book that I question, but it's refreshing to see a "progressive" Episcopalian make a case for why we need to retain the traditional language of sin and salvation.

George said...

I think on the back of your other recent posts, it points to a Gospel that is very simple and very clear, its doesn't need to be hyped nor defended. It is what it is, and is on offer to all freely - but and it is a big 'but' that is to often glossed over, if you accept there is a cost and that cost is your life, your best (also freely given)

David said...

Fr. Stephan Freeman, http://fatherstephen.wordpress.com/2007/01/29/learning-to-sin, wrote: "As strange as it sounds--human beings have to 'learn to sin.' Not that we need any help doing the things that sinners do--all of that comes quite easily to us. But we have to learn that we are sinners--and this does not come easily to us."

Bryan Owen said...

Thanks for sharing the words and the link to the posting from Fr. Stephen's blog, David. He's one of my favorite Christian bloggers.